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A ‘Day’ In The Life Of Natasha

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 Published: August 19, 2019 03:06 pm EDT

 

Guelph Today has shone its spotlight on Natasha Day, the transplanted Australian that has been working double duty in the Ontario racing industry.


Natasha Day, pictured in the paddock at Grand River Raceway.

Day has been a mainstay on the province’s ‘B-track’ circuit for the past four years. She’s driven in more than 1,600 pari-mutuel harness races during that time, trying to get the most out of her charges and carve out a living in what has generally been a male-dominated industry.

Although she has been spending a decent amount of time in the race bike, Day hasn’t had much time to kick back. She’s busy in the barn in the mornings, exercising horses and tending to the many duties that an active stable requires. After racing in the evenings, Day is paddocking horses. As the Guelph Today article states — something those in the industry know very well — that schedule calls for a long day and a long week.

“You’ve got to do it 120 per cent. You’ve got to go above and beyond and do it until you’re almost dead and then maybe people start taking notice,” Day said.


Natasha Day, pictured calling the shots in the sulky.

During her interview for the article, Day stated that she is looking for a bit of a lucky break in terms of her career in the sulky. Until that break comes, Day is going to keep on trying to get the most out of her available drives.

“You talk to everyone you can and get out on the track and show them what you can do,” Day said. “Nine times out of 10 you drive the worst horse, but you try and finish fourth or fifth if you’re lucky and hope next time you get another chance or a better horse.”

Regardless of whether she is setting the driving world on fire or not, Day is doing her best to break the mould when it comes to women’s role and abilities in the industry.

“(According to the prevailing stereotype) If you’re a girl, you’re a groom,” Day said. “People are a little bit shocked when they see you can drive. We had to kind of get people to take notice.”

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